The Important Role of Probiotics in Sports Nutrition

Athletes and fitness enthusiasts work hard to improve their health and conditioning. However, they sometimes have issues with their digestion and immunity even as they strive to improve their physical performance. The probiotic strain Bacillus subtilis DE111 can help give fitness enthusiasts and serious athletes a performance boost.

The Sports Nutrition Market is Growing Rapidly

Sports nutrition is the leading projected growth sector in global healthcare, far outpacing other areas such as OTC, vitamin and dietary supplements, and weight management. A recent report by Zion Market Research estimates the global sports nutrition market will grow about 8% annually over the next few years, reaching over $45 billion by 2022. The category includes products such as sports drinks, meal replacement drinks, protein powder, nutrition bars, and dietary supplements that are consumed by professional and amateur athletes to improve their overall health, performance, and muscle growth. Typical goals of a sports nutrition program include muscle and strength building, weight loss, cardiovascular improvement, increased energy, and better sleep.

Athletes May Suffer from Digestive Issues

Despite their typical healthy appearance, athletes may suffer from a number of digestive issues. In facts, studies show that 30% to 50% of athletes and up to 93% of long-distance triathletes suffer from gastrointestinal problems. These issues can occur before, during, or after an exercise session or a competition. Gastrointestinal issues can impair performance or recovery by causing electrolytes imbalance, sleep disturbance, and dehydration. Additionally, a recent study of a group of ultra-marathon runners found 89% experienced nausea, 44% had abdominal cramps, and 44% suffered from diarrhea.

Probiotic Supplements Can Help Ease Gastrointestinal Issues in Athletes

Probiotic supplements boost athletic performance many important ways. First, they help optimize digestion by increasing the absorption of nutrients and digestion of protein, providing the building blocks for muscle building and recovery. Probiotics accomplish this by maintaining levels of healthy bacteria in the gut that aid in the digestion of macronutrients, allowing for optimized nutrient uptake from food. Next, they help strengthen immunity by increasing the absorption of antioxidants making athletes less susceptible to sickness and infection. Finally, they minimize common GI issues, decreasing the occurrence of athlete’s diarrhea, gas, bloating, and heartburn.

Studies Show DE111 Probiotic Can Help in Sports Nutrition

The probiotic strain Bacillus subtilis DE111 from Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes is a spore-forming strain that helps provide a competitive edge to athletes. For example, in a study on the effects of supplementation during offseason resistance training in female Division I athletes, DE111 produced significant improvements in body composition when consumed in conjunction with a high-protein recovery drink. It also helped improve lower body strength as determined by the deadlift 1-repetition maximum. In a separate study on the effect of DE111 on the daily bowel movement profile for people with occasional gastrointestinal irregularity, DE111 helped improve gastrointestinal discomfort including constipation and diarrhea. Participants also reported an increased frequency of normal type stools compared to those in the placebo group.

The DE111 strain is genome sequenced for safety, remains viable under wide temperature range, and survives passage through the acidic environment of GI tract to help crowd out bacterial pathogens and maintain healthy gut barrier function. To find out more about how DE111 can help in sports nutrition, download this white paper.

Supplement Delivery Forms Can Be as Important as the Supplement Itself

Now that you have the perfect formula to add to your product line, what dosage form should you choose for delivery? Capsules, tablets, softgels, powder or liquid? During the development process for a new dietary supplement, besides the choice of active ingredients, it’s important to consider the final dosage form. The dosage form is not only important for how the product will ultimately be presented to the consumer but also may have critical influence on the formulation itself due to technical, efficacy and shelf life constraints.

Fortunately, there are a variety of dosage delivery options across supplements and plenty of new technologies and trends in the industry.

Powders and Liquids: Mixing it Up

Traditional forms such as tablets and capsules along with powders and liquids require different packaging and storage conditions to deliver safe and efficacious products while still appealing to shifting consumer trends. When deciding which supplements are best suited to an individual’s needs, in addition to overall product quality, it is essential to consider how delivery form may impact usability, stability and shelf life. Otherwise, you end up with products that harden, oxidize, taste bad, mix badly, change color, or even become rancid. Certain ingredients, for example, mix best in powder form. Protein or other nutrients that do not require exact measurements are especially well-suited to powder formulas. The downside is that powder sitting in water over time can cause microbial growth, making it dangerous to consume. Liquids are another option, especially for a quick, no-hassle way to take a supplement. However, liquid formulations limit the amount of active material available in a serving and are not ideal for bad-tasting substances. Popular dosage forms are diverse and expanding with consumer preference.

Tablets, Capsules, and Softgels: All in Good Taste

Capsules are perfect for almost any product needing a highly precise dosage measurement or for those with a bad taste. Tablets can also deliver a precisely measured dose and offer a similar breakdown time to capsules: about 20 minutes. However, it is possible to scientifically manipulate dissolution time by coating capsules in ingredients targeted to certain delivery specifications. Softgels offer an effective delivery form for liquid or oil-based formulas. Available in different sizes and colors, the contents are typically suspended in oils, making softgels and ideal delivery form for lipid- and fat-soluble nutrients such as efficacious oils, fatty acids, fat-soluble extracts or fat-soluble lettered vitamins. Innovative capsule-in-capsule technology makes it possible to combine both powders and liquids into a single dosage form, creating new opportunities to have incompatible ingredients play well together to deliver added benefits not previously possible.

Powders in Stick Packs: Easy-to-Swallow Innovations

Powders in stick packs, or sachets, are gaining popularity. These new technologies have been developed partly in response to issues of swallowability. Other dosage forms or delivery systems are seeing increasing interest to avoid the “pill fatigue” issue that seems to be trending. Powders in Stick Packs and liquids in “shots” seem to be gaining ground in the market due to their convenience and portability for today’s on-the-go lifestyle.

Important Considerations for Supplement Dosage Forms

Quality will always be a key consideration in choosing wellness supplements. However, efficacy and bioavailability are critical as well. Depending on the dosage form, one may have to rethink formulation requirements to accommodate the attributes needed. For example, flow and compaction characteristics, particle size and solubility all must fit the purpose for solid dosage forms. Add to those taste and appearance characteristics for those forms that will be consumed in powder or liquid forms and formulation issues can become much more complicated. Shelf life requirements are also a major consideration that should not be overlooked in the choice of ingredients, dosage form and packaging format. After all, the best ingredients in the best dosage form hold little value to the consumer if they do not deliver the best quality and efficacy at the stated expiration date on the label.

As a start-to-finish provider, Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes delivers contract manufacturing services for science-backed enzyme and probiotic-based formulations. Learn more here about the manufacturing capabilities of Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes.

FDA Shifts To CFU Labeling for Supplements, Still Comes Up Short According to Experts

In September 2018, the FDA issued a draft guidance on how to label supplements containing live microbials. The announcement presents the organization’s “intent to exercise enforcement discretion to allow supplement companies to use colony forming units (CFUs) when declaring the quantity of live microbials on a Supplement Facts Label.”

 Why the Guidance Was Issued

The new guidance comes in response to a widespread disagreement over the use of the weight of ingredients versus colony forming units (CFUs). The new guidance does allow manufacturers to incorporate CFUs; however, weight must still be included on the label, and listed in order of predominance by mass quantity.

Despite the fact that the FDA believes “CFUs provide a useful description of the quantity of live microbial dietary ingredients,” it rejected a petition from the International Probiotics Association to list ingredients only by CFUs rather than weight. While disappointed that the FDA denied the petition, the IPA still considers the new guidance a victory in promoting the use of CFUs. Although weight, which has proven to be an inaccurate way to measure microbials, will continue to be a requirement, the addition of CFUs in live microbial labeling provides consumers with more information to choose the best product for them.

FDA Will Allow CFU Labeling, But Supplements Must Meet 7 Requirements

 The FDA will permit CFU labeling of microbial dietary ingredients provided the following requirements are met:

  1. The quantity is first listed in terms of weight.
  2. The declaration of quantity in CFUs is expressed in a manner that is clearly separate and readily distinguishable from the weight, e.g., as a parenthetical or in a subset line.
  3. The declaration of the quantity in CFUs is formatted in clear terms that can easily be understood by a common reader, e.g., 10 billion or 300* (where the unit that “*” is intended to represent is a typical measurement of CFUs, and is clearly indicated elsewhere in the Supplement Facts label).
  4. The declaration of quantity in CFUs is accurate and not misleading, does not render misleading other aspects of the Supplement Facts label, or other aspects of the product label.
  5. The declaration of quantity in CFUs measures only live microbial ingredients and does not include inactive, dead, or nonviable organisms.
  6. Live microbial dietary ingredients in a proprietary blend are listed in descending order of predominance by weight; and
  7. The product label otherwise complies with all applicable laws and regulations.

 Scientists Prefer CFUs to Measure Live Microbials

CFUs are the scientifically accepted unit of measurement for probiotics. Rather than painstakingly counting every cell individually under a microscope, scientists dilute a sample of microbes and spread it across a Petri plate, allowing them to count groups of microbes, called colonies, with the naked eye. However, each CFU doesn’t necessarily correspond to a single microbe. But if the cells stick together in lumps or chains, the CFU instead refers to these groupings. Each colony is assumed to have grown from a single colony-forming unit, or CFU.

 CRN Commends Guidance but Has Reservations

Another group advocating for CFU usage is the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), the leading trade association for the dietary supplement and functional food industry. While the news of the draft guidance was indeed hopeful, they worry it doesn’t go far enough. Like the IPA, CRN’s main concern is that weight, which must still be included in labeling, isn’t an accurate measurement for determining live microbial counts in products.

CRN thinks the FDA is heading in the right direction but cautions that a “dual listing of ingredient quantity in weight and CFUs presents conflicting product labeling information and puts responsible industry members in an untenable position.”

Why This Matters to Supplement Companies

 At present, the FDA is garnering much feedback on their draft guidance, opinions which may alter their current stance that weight must be included in supplement labeling. Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes wants to ensure that the industry stays abreast of regulatory changes. By subscribing to our blog, Digestible, you can remain current with market trends and regulatory developments that affect how the supplements you sell must be labeled, and the best way to communicate any changes with your customers.

DE111 Probiotic Provides Benefits for Body Fat Percentage and Athletic Performance, According to Clinical Study

Researchers have found that consumption of the probiotic strain DE111® in conjunction with adequate post-workout nutrition can improve body composition and indices of athletic performance during offseason training in collegiate athletes, according to a study recently published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

The study found that compared to the placebo, the probiotic DE111 produced statistically significantly improvements in the reduction of body fat percentage, and a strong trend indicating improved performance of the deadlift exercise. “These findings are encouraging for athletic individuals, both professional and recreational, that are looking for ways to naturally achieve maximum results from their training efforts,” said Dr. John Deaton, vice president of science and technology at Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes.

Twenty-three collegiate female athletes participated in the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. The athletes completed the same 10-week resistance training program during the offseason, which consisted of 3-4 workouts per week of upper and lower-body exercises and sport-specific training. The athletes consumed a DE111 or placebo supplement in conjunction with a recovery protein drink immediately following resistance and sport-specific training for the entire 10-week program.

DE111 is a genome sequenced and clinically tested strain of Bacillus subtilis, a probiotic spore that supports digestive and immune health. The genome sequencing confirmed the strain contained no plasmids, antibiotic resistant or deleterious genes; the human clinical studies showed the strain’s ability to control microbial populations, aid in digestion and maintain general health. DE111 has the ability to form spores that protect the microbes from harsh conditions until they enter an environment ripe for germination, such as the GI tract. Because of this spore-forming ability, DE111 remains viable under a wide temperature and pH range, making it ideal for use in supplements as well as food and beverages.

How to Combine Probiotics and Prebiotics to Maximize their Benefits

Probiotics, living microorganisms like yeasts and bacteria in our intestines, promote digestive health, support a healthy immune system, and can help reduce the unwanted effects of bloating, gas, or diarrhea. Prebiotics, on the other hand, employ the non-digestible fibers or starches commonly found in legumes, whole wheat foods, onions, cabbages, asparagus, and oatmeal to help probiotic microorganisms flourish. In addition, novel prebiotics, such as lactoferrin, almond lipids and bacteriophages are being identified. Synbiotics, supplements that combine probiotics and prebiotics in a powerful synergy, can maximize the beneficial effects of both.

Prebiotics Help Probiotics Survive and Thrive
Probiotic supplements contain live microorganisms that enhance health by improving the balance of microflora or microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract. But to be effective, probiotics must survive the stomach’s acidic environment, as well as bile and pancreatic secretions into the small intestine. Once they survive, probiotics then compete for nutrients with harmful bacteria in the gut.

Prebiotic supplements help maintain digestive balance while supplying the required nutrition probiotics need to thrive. A prebiotic is defined as a non-digestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and activity of a limited number of bacteria in the colon. This implies that each individual prebiotic may stimulate the growth and activity of some probiotics but not others. The key is careful selection of the appropriate prebiotic that improves the functionality of each probiotic.

Synbiotics Provide the Right Combination of Prebiotics and Probiotics
There is a right way to combine selected probiotics and prebiotics into an optimal product supplement that feeds the human biome. Many common fiber-based prebiotics have the unfortunate side effect of feeding both good and bad bacteria. In addition, they typically require massive doses to be effective – doses which won’t even fit into a single capsule – and may cause gas and digestive discomfort. An ideal synbiotic, on the other hand, should combine the correct prebiotics in the exact proportions necessary to maximize the desired beneficial health effects of specific probiotic strains by stimulating the growth and activating the metabolism of a limited number of health-promoting bacteria. In this way, synbiotic products improve the survival of live microbial supplements in the gastrointestinal tract. When the synergistic effect is optimized between prebiotics and probiotics, the beneficial effects of each are optimized.

Probiotics and Prebiotics Together Make a Dynamic Duo
Enzymes alone are good, enzymes plus probiotics are better, and enzymes, probiotics, and prebiotics together are best. Enzymes help drive the nutritional uptake of the food while the probiotics ensure a good digestive balance and flora. Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes developed the novel prebiotic, PreforPro, to further enhance the health benefits of these supplements. More than 20 studies have been performed to confirm the safety and efficacy of PreforPro in promoting the growth of a broad spectrum of probiotic species while crowding out undesirable bacteria.

Learn more about the prebiotic power of PreforPro by visiting https://www.deerlandenzymes.com/preforpro/ today.

Functional Foods Fuel Both Consumers and Business

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” This saying by Hippocrates from nearly 2,500 years ago still rings true—and has garnered renewed attention given today’s increasing concerns about the foods we eat. Much of this interest has focused on foods that improve our health and well-being, some of which are physiologically active. These are known as functional foods.

The term “functional foods” is used to describe foods that go beyond the purpose of meeting basic nutritional needs. The additional health benefits provided by functional foods have been brought into the spotlight over recent decades as links have been established between the quality and composition of foods and our overall well-being.

The Origin of Functional Foods

A term first coined in Japan in the mid-1980s, functional foods referred to processed foods that included additional ingredients aimed explicitly at aiding bodily function. The popularity of functional foods in Japan has spurred that emergence of a regulatory process to govern the industry in the country. Officially noted as Foods for Specified Health Use (FOSHU), the Japanese Ministry of Health has licensed approximately 100 FOSHU foods.

Functional Foods in the United States

While the presence of functional foods is widespread in the United States, there is no specific category recognized by the federal government. As food science has evolved over recent years, some organizations have taken note of this emerging market and worked to provide support and recognition of the industry. The Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board (IOM/FNB) has even introduced its definition of functional foods as “any food or food ingredient that may provide a health benefit beyond the traditional nutrients it contains.”

Health Benefits

Advancements in health science research have helped the scientific community to discover some of the benefits of functional foods. While many research studies are ongoing, numerous reports of clinical trials, in vivo, in vitro, and epidemiological studies have concluded that plant-based diets may help prevent chronic diseases.

Furthermore, there has been increasing recognition of the benefits of phytochemicals in the medical community. Companies have utilized research like this to help market food products developed to improve overall health.  And with the establishment of the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 (NLEA), messages that relate to health or disease could be printed directly on food labels for consumers to view.

The Functional Food Market

Business is booming! The functional food market was estimated to have a worldwide revenue of 300 billion US dollars in 2017, and that number is projected to increase to $440 billion over the next five years, according to statista.com. Bolstered by personalization and fragmentation, the functional food business has made tremendous gains as consumer sentiment has geared more toward taking control of the foods they eat. This trend is continuing to gain ground, and the functional food market is positioned to grow by its side.

With more and more consumers looking to improve their digestive wellness and overall health, adding probiotics to foods and drinks is becoming very popular. As an industry leader in formulating probiotics and other enzyme-based dietary supplements, Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes is proud to deliver quality products like DE111. This probiotic strain delivers digestive and immune health benefits in supplements, foods, and beverages.

Learn more about Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes and our science-supported dietary supplement formulations today!

When to Take Digestive Enzymes: Just as Important as Which You Take

Enzymes play an essential role in physiological processes throughout the body. Natural digestive enzymes, such as lipase, amylase, and protease, aid in breaking down fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. Additionally, enzyme supplements can be taken to help improve digestion. But if you take these supplements at the wrong time, they may be completely ineffective. Let’s take a closer look at when taking those enzymes will maximize their effectiveness.

Enzymes are Catalysts

Enzymes, which are made up of amino acids, catalyze biological functions. As you probably learned in high school chemistry, catalysts are used to speed up a chemical reaction or allow it to occur at a lower temperature than it would normally. In the same way, digestive enzymes enable the body to perform biological functions that otherwise would not occur at physiological temperatures.

Digestive Catalysts Can Only Work When There is Something to Metabolize

Some people incorrectly put enzyme supplements in the same category as vitamins, thinking that if they just take one in the morning, it will do its job throughout the day. But a digestive enzyme needs a substrate in order to catalyze a reaction – in other words, food. Just like your friend who shows up on moving day after the apartment has been emptied, taking an enzyme supplement when there’s nothing in your digestive system to metabolize is simply a waste of a valuable resource.

Enzymes Should be Taken with Food

It’s crucial to take enzymes as directed. That means, in most cases, you should take digestive enzyme supplements along with food. In many instances, they should be taken in combination with specific foods in order to properly perform their intended function. Lactase supplements, for example, include the enzymes that digest milk sugars, so they should be taken along with dairy products. Likewise, amylase supplements help the body digest the complex sugars found in legumes and vegetables to reduce bloating and gas, so they should be taken just before eating these foods.

To determine when to take a digestive enzyme, or any supplement, refer to the instruction label of the product. Some digestive supplements are intended to be taken with a meal, while others should be taken shortly before eating. Also, check the proper dosage, which will vary based on the type and strength of the enzyme supplement. If you are unsure or have any questions, ask your pharmacist or nutritionist. And of course, if you are taking any medications, be sure to consult your doctor before using any supplement.

Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes & Probiotics Knows Digestive Supplements

At Deerland, our product development experts formulate many of the popular, high quality enzyme supplements you will find in stores and online.  Incorporating enzymes, probiotics and/or prebiotics, we create condition-specific supplement products to address a wide range of digestive issues.

Learn more at https://www.deerlandenzymes.com/about-us-2/research-development-team/

White Paper: Chocolate + Probiotics

Delicious dark chocolate is a sweet delivery system for probiotics, and combining the two delivers a bounty of healthy benefits. Download this white paper to learn more about how Bacillus subtilis DE111 makes it possible to add probiotics to chocolates.

Click the image below to download.

Infographic: Types of Protein Supplements

When it comes to the protein supplement market, there definitely is no lack of variety. As these supplements increase in popularity, it’s important to understand the different varieties and what effects they have on your body. Regardless of which protein supplement is right for you, the addition of enzymes like ProHydrolase to your protein regimen can help your body make the most of the ingested protein.

Click the image below to enlarge.

Enzymes Can Help Unlock the Full Health Benefits of Vegetables

We all heard it as kids: “Eat your vegetables!” Vegetables are full of vitamins, minerals, healthy fats, carbohydrates, and protein. Yes, like animal cells, plant cells are full of proteins. The problem is that most plant proteins—and many other nutrients—can’t be easily accessed because plant cells are surrounded by cell walls made of cellulose. Since human beings lack the cellulase enzyme, they cannot effectively digest cellulose. As a result, the majority of plant nutrients will pass right through us, unused by our bodies.

The Cellulose Problem

The fact of the matter is mammals cannot digest cellulose at all. Most herbivores tend to be large animals because they need a large digestive system to handle eating nothing but plant material. Cows, for example, have multiple stomachs and have to re-chew their food once it’s partially digested to get the most nutrition possible from the plants they eat. To digest cellulose, you have to be something like a termite, which can eat wood.

Vegetarians and vegans need access to these plant nutrients. Vegans, who not only avoid meat but also avoid dairy and eggs, need plant proteins. But how can we access these proteins and fats found in vegetables if cellulose cannot be digested?

Supplemental Enzymes Help Your Body

Raw fruits and vegetables grown in nutrient-rich soils already contain the enzymes needed for us to digest the plants’ proteins and carbohydrates. Fruits and vegetables with the most enzymes when eaten raw include papayas, mangoes, pineapples, apples, avocados, carrots, grapefruit, spinach, and tomatoes. However, most people eat cooked, canned, and prepared foods that can destroy the naturally-occurring enzymes that help us with digestion.

One way to make up this deficit is to take supplemental enzymes with meals. Digestive enzymes can help your body break down vegetables for nutrition. Furthermore, because humans do not make cellulase, those needing to access more nutrients from vegetables should certainly supplement their diets with cellulase enzymes.

The American Diet and the Microbiome

It’s also becoming increasingly clear that a more plant-based diet can improve the gut’s microbiome by ensuring a wider range of healthy organisms. The typical American diet of processed foods can be so detrimental to the gut microbiome that we may not respond as healthfully to a plant-based diet we’d expect. Eating more raw fruits and vegetables is one way to change this situation.

Eating vegetables will undoubtedly improve your health, but if you can better digest those vegetables, they will provide you with even more benefits. If you are a vegetarian or a vegan, it’s important to make sure your body has access to all the nutrients possible from your plant-based diet. Consider taking an enzyme supplement and see if you have fewer abdominal issues and better overall health.

To learn more about how enzymes work to improve digestive health, visit Deerland Probiotics & Enzymes at https://www.deerlandenzymes.com/swallow/enzymes-101/.